blink(16) prototype is woody and awesome

A few days ago ThingM friend Rusty, operator of the wonderful SomaFM, wondered if there would ever be a “blink(16)”: a blink(1) with a 4×4 grid of LEDs. Well it turns out that due to a secret feature of all blink(1) mk2s, it’s actually pretty easy to make, if you have some WS2812-style LED strip laying around.

 

blink16-somafm-500px

Making a blink(1) mk2 use 16 extra LEDs is pretty easy because it has a hidden 3-pin port for wiring up WS2812/NeoPixel-type LED strips.  In this photo, you can see the three holes: one each for Gnd, +5V, and data.

Below is a video showing it in action.  The two ‘blink1-tool’ commands used in the video are:

blink1-tool --random=1000  -l 18 -m 50 -t 50
blink1-tool --running  -l 18 -m 200 -t 200

Notice the “-l” option. Using this option, you can control a single LED in a blink(1) mk2. For instance, on a regular blink(1) mk2, you can do:

blink1-tool -l 1 --red
blink1-tool -l 2 --blue

to make the top LED red and the bottom one blue. For the “random” and “running” commands, the “-l” option means how many LEDs to use.

Some build photos from Flickr:
blink(16) blink(1) prototype
blink(16) prototype
blink(16) prototype
blink(16) prototype

6 Comments

René

It´s limited to 16 additional LEDs, right?
I´m thinking about the possibility to realize a ambilight with only one blink(1) and WS2812 LEDs.
Connecting blink(1) to Prismatik would be great :)

http://lightpack.tv/downloads

todbot

Yes, the blink(1) mk2 can drive 18 LEDs total: two on the device and 16 additional.
Control with Prismatik sounds cool, I’ve got a LightPack as a KS backers, I should pull it out and try it again!

Continuous IoT Software Releases (w/ blink(1)!) | ThingM Blog

[…] ElectricFlow is a tool designed to orchestrate large-scale software delivery.  This is an increasingly notorious problem for everyone in the IoT space.  To demonstrate how ElectricFlow could work for automotive software delivery, ElectricCloud made a simulation using a Raspberry Pi and a few blink(1) lights. This is a great example of how blink(1)s can be useful: you need a simple non-screen indicator on your embedded system.  (and remember if you need more LEDs, blink(1)s can be hacked to add up to 18 LEDs) […]

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